Monthly Archives: March 2013

Leadership Development: Reflection Rather Than Training? (2)

Reflection vs Training2 Leadership Development: Reflection Rather Than Training? (2)He argues that just because someone goes through an experience, it does not mean that they have learnt from that experience. For example, it was shown that most managers were not active and continuous learners (Bunker & Webb, 1992). The point is amplified by Velsor and Guthrie: Continue reading

Leadership Development: Reflection Rather Than Training?

Reflection vs Training Leadership Development: Reflection Rather Than Training?Drawing on Conger’s (1996) and Burgoyne et al.’s (2004) concerns about the efficacy of leadership training, and linked to Day (2000) and Drath’s (1998) argument for leadership development to be oriented towards social systems, should formal leadership development emphasize education more than training? Continue reading

Leadership Development: an Act of Faith?

an Act of Faith Leadership Development: an Act of Faith? The final theme explores four interrelated issues. The first examines whether leadership development can be measured or whether it is simply best understood as an act of faith. The second theme explores the essential need to contextualize any form of intervention if any progress is to go beyond the act of faith. Continue reading

Key Lessons of Learning Leadership Experience (7)

Key Lessons7 Key Lessons of Learning Leadership Experience (7)Further, Conger (1993) argues for an organized approach and believes that too much leadership development has occurred in a ‘haphazard process’ (1993: 46), with little intentionality, accountability or evaluation (ibid.). Drawing these notions of development together, an equation is offered (McCauley et al., 1998: 223): Continue reading

Key Lessons of Learning Leadership Experience (6)

Key Lessons6 Key Lessons of Learning Leadership Experience (6)For example, work by Avolio and Luthans (2006) identified the importance of ‘trigger moments’, Bennis and Thomas (2002) highlighted ‘transformative experiences’ that shifted an individual’s identity, and Janson (2008) identified the significance of ‘leadership formative experiences’ – often attached to emotional incidents. Continue reading